3 ways to ensure that your training programs are effective

Worldwide, companies spend millions, even billions of dollars on training employees in order to improve the important skills needed to do a better job at work. The big question is, however, how effective are these training programs? HR and training managers often come across the question whether the training programs they are spending so much money on are effective at all. If you really want to succeed as trainer, you will need to be able to give your clients their money’s worth.

As a trainer myself, I am also always interested in finding out how I can measure the effectiveness of training programs I conduct, and I came across two articles that provide some nice insights on how to measure the effectiveness.

In the first article, titled “Measuring the effectiveness of your training program” (http://ubm.io/1QnAfEn), Rose Polchin discusses using the four-level training evaluation model created by Donald Kirkpatrick. In her article, Polchin describes the model as a tool to help you to objectively analyze the effectiveness and find out how you can improve your training program.

dilbert20031663411201Source: Dilbert on training

In addition to the information shared in the previous mentioned article, John Eades provides some very handy tips on how to evaluate the effectiveness of a training. In his article ”3 Ways Organizations Can Improve The Way They Measure Training Effectiveness” (http://bit.ly/1XRQQRn), John suggest using visual confirmation by asking learners to post vidoes of theirselves putting into practice what they learned, creating social ownership and performing skills assessments.

As you will go through the two articles mentioned above, you will no doubt fully agree with me that every trainer must design his training program with the effectiveness of that program in his mind. This means that there are three important steps you as a trainer cannot afford to skip;

  1. Always remember that when designing and conducting a training program, it’s never about yourself but about the trainees. Your program should be designed in such a way that it can clearly be seen how participants can put what they’ve learned into use.
  2. Not everyone learns in the same way. A good training programs caters to the different learning styles, this will help you create a better engagement with all of your trainees. Do some research about different learning styles and what you can do to increase the effectiveness for each style.
  3. Don’t forget to include ways to effectively measure whether or not you have achieved your learning goals with the training. Using the Kirkpatrick 4 level evaluation model should provide you with the right tool to find out if you were able to make your training stick.

From my experience as a trainer, I came to learn that in the field there are people who just pass on information and there are trainers who actually know how to create the right learning environment. If you want to be among those who actually add value to their learners, taking the three above mentioned steps are a great way to start off.

Marciano Lie A Young is a trainer and consultant who has conducted training programs on Leadership, Work-life balance, Entrepreneurship and Public speaking in over 20 countries in 4 continents.
He is the director of the Leaders Management Group Foundation, an organization that offers training and consultancy services to Small and Medium businesses. You can follow him on twitter on @marcianolie or visit his blog www.marcianolieayoung.com.

[note: this blog post was written as part of an writing assignment for my “Engagement & Nurture Marketing Strategies” course at the Northwestern University.]

Mission ITF: Accomplished

Just today I received this exciting news from JCI!  I have reached the highest level for trainers within JCI – ITF (International Training Fellow)
Ever since I graduated from JCI Prime in 2000 and even more when I graduated from JCI Excel in 2005, I have been working hard towards the accomplishments of one very important JCI goal for myself: reaching the level of ITF (international training fellow)
On November 25th, 2007 I reached the IG level and made it a priority goal to reach the ITF level by December 2008.

So just imagine my excitement (not to mention pride :-)) when I received this email from the JCI Training Director… YES! I have reached the ITF level!

There is a long list of people who I am thankful to, for their support and guidance and of course for being there when I really needed it.

WOW! I think this is the start of yet another great journey within JCI!

So far my JCI Training certifications are:
Trainers level: ITF (International Training Fellow) # 114

JCI Official courses certifications:
JCI Presenter – Head Trainer
JCI Achieve – Head Trainer
JCI HeadTrainer – Head Trainer   
JCI Admin – Assistant Trainer
JCI Trainer – Assistant Trainer

JCI Designer – Assistant Trainer

Conducting training at the JCI World Congress in New Delhi, India

From November 2nd to November 10th I was in New Delhi, to attend the 2008 JCI World Congress. I’ve been looking forward to this congress, because this would provide me the opportunity to gain the much needed training hours towards my ITF (International Training Fellow) certification. Ever since I reached my IG level in November 2007, I’ve conducted training in Panama and Jamaica and I needed 6 more international hours to reach my ITF, hours that I would be getting by conducting training at the World Congress.

For the world congress I was scheduled as Head Trainer for JCI Presenter, Assistant trainer for JCI Admin and one of my own courses, Me Inc!

I conducted the JCI Presenter course together with Kamal Dabawala, from India. Kamal proved to be a very excellent and talented trainer and I truly enjoyed training with him. This has been my third JCI Presenter as head trainer and I was truly impressed by Kamal’s resourcefulness.
For JCI Admin I was one of the assistant trainers, together with Jean-Phillipe Valentin from Martinique and Adetola Sogbesan from Nigeria. Our head trainer was Nicole van Hooy, from the Netherlands. This training was completely new to me, but I think this is one of the most interesting JCI Official courses and a real must do for all Local and National organizations.
Unfortunately  I had to cancel Me Inc!, because I got sick.

Both JCI Presenter and JCI Admin had highly active participants, which made the training very interesting. If you ask me there is nothing as fun a class full of active participants, asking questions and sharing their experience. I learned a lot and surely had a great time.

I will invite the participants for JCI Presenter and JCI Admin to share their thoughts about this training sessions, give some feedback and some comments on how they think I did as trainer.

 

Seminar Corporate Social Responsibility

On Thursday, October 23rd, I facilitated the seminar Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR). This was an public seminar with 27 participants from different companies from Suriname, both SME’s as Large corporations and even one of the big Multinationals here in Suriname. Directors, deputy directors, managers and other executives from companies such as Staatsolie, Rosebel Goldmines (IamGold), Landbouwbank, IBM, Optiek Ninon, JSOOC, Haukes NV and the deparment of Justice actively participated with this session.

The seminar was full of interesting discussions, combined with somecase studies on CSR implementations and ethical considerations. 

One of the main reasons to organize this seminar was to create the awareness and to trigger Surinamese companies to start with an nationwide CSR organization in Suriname. I will be following up with the participants to find out if they are willing to support the idea for this nationwide CSR organization, and try to be amongst thos who put efforts into bringing more live into and spicing up the CSR movement in Suriname.

The World at Your feet as you Speak

On September 1st, 2nd and 5th I organized and conducted the Pragmatic training on Creating Effective Presentations. The participants had one major advantage with this training; as this was the first time I organized it, they received a special registration fee of SRD 100,- compared to the normal fee I will be using starting October 1st, which is US$ 100,-.
In 3 days 10 participants worked on their presentation skills, using and creating some very nice presentations on flipcharts and in PowerPoint. I really had the feeling this training was a great experience for both the participants and me, and I am looking forward to the response I will get from the participants. I asked them to write their comments on this blog website, so I am really looking forward to it.